1. leonsadler:

Here’s a rejected page from my new book
if you want to receive a surprise pack containing this and 2 other new secret zines, paypal me £10 to l_m_s_n (@) yahoo.com
or watch out for www.famiconexpress.co.uk in a few weeks

    leonsadler:

    Here’s a rejected page from my new book

    if you want to receive a surprise pack containing this and 2 other new secret zines, paypal me £10 to l_m_s_n (@) yahoo.com

    or watch out for www.famiconexpress.co.uk in a few weeks

  2. jonnynegron:

Pieces from my exhibition at Farewell Books are now available for purchase at their website 

    jonnynegron:

    Pieces from my exhibition at Farewell Books are now available for purchase at their website 

  3. franksantoro:

Pompeii, 79 AD. Flavius, a renowned but unfaithful painter, enters into an affair with a princess from Rome, far from the eyes of Alba, his wife. His assistant, Marcus, limited to the task of preparing colors, tries to learn his profession while serving as a cover for the infidelity of his master. But a disaster, the eruption of Vesuvius, will forever seal the fate of the city…
Universal feelings, noble artistic ambitions, existential questions, characters condemned by their capriciousness…the American cartoonist Frank Santoro combines all the ingredients of a romantic tragedy against the backdrop of a real historical disaster that will surprise more than a few. This is because, as we will see, its originality comes not from its perfectly banal plot, but indeed from its stunning graphic approach. In Pompeii there are few details but the desire to depict accurately. Behind the apparent naïveté of the whole, there appears little by little, over the course of the book, a baffling and touching expressivity. We feel the suffocating heat of the eruption, the fragility of feelings, the urgency of the catastrophe, the grace of human bodies. Never transparent though they may be loosely sketched, the characters literally live the story. Flavius and Marcus, caught up in their troubles, try to escape the ephemeral by fixing on a canvas or a wall the eternal beauty of a face or a landscape.
With pencil sketches, Santoro’s rough line draws its strength from contrasts of colors and of ambiances in sepia hues. With his visual language in motion and the beautiful energy imbued in expressions or postures, Santoro invites us to be immersed and leaves the rest to the reader. To imagine, to feel, to tremble; it is a delicate gambit, but he succeeds. Even if the drawing risks, perhaps, to dissuade more than a few, making the effort to overcome that first impression is eventually rewarded. The balance between content and form is here, unfailingly, much more beautiful than it is unstable. Pompeii, an exciting ancient drama filled with tension, thus avoids a grand spectacle in favor of an intimate fresco, like a painting of feelings stunning in accuracy and truth.
-review of Pompeii by M. Ellis for BoDoï
(translated by Andrew White)

    franksantoro:

    Pompeii, 79 AD. Flavius, a renowned but unfaithful painter, enters into an affair with a princess from Rome, far from the eyes of Alba, his wife. His assistant, Marcus, limited to the task of preparing colors, tries to learn his profession while serving as a cover for the infidelity of his master. But a disaster, the eruption of Vesuvius, will forever seal the fate of the city…

    Universal feelings, noble artistic ambitions, existential questions, characters condemned by their capriciousness…the American cartoonist Frank Santoro combines all the ingredients of a romantic tragedy against the backdrop of a real historical disaster that will surprise more than a few. This is because, as we will see, its originality comes not from its perfectly banal plot, but indeed from its stunning graphic approach. In Pompeii there are few details but the desire to depict accurately. Behind the apparent naïveté of the whole, there appears little by little, over the course of the book, a baffling and touching expressivity. We feel the suffocating heat of the eruption, the fragility of feelings, the urgency of the catastrophe, the grace of human bodies. Never transparent though they may be loosely sketched, the characters literally live the story. Flavius and Marcus, caught up in their troubles, try to escape the ephemeral by fixing on a canvas or a wall the eternal beauty of a face or a landscape.

    With pencil sketches, Santoro’s rough line draws its strength from contrasts of colors and of ambiances in sepia hues. With his visual language in motion and the beautiful energy imbued in expressions or postures, Santoro invites us to be immersed and leaves the rest to the reader. To imagine, to feel, to tremble; it is a delicate gambit, but he succeeds. Even if the drawing risks, perhaps, to dissuade more than a few, making the effort to overcome that first impression is eventually rewarded. The balance between content and form is here, unfailingly, much more beautiful than it is unstable. Pompeii, an exciting ancient drama filled with tension, thus avoids a grand spectacle in favor of an intimate fresco, like a painting of feelings stunning in accuracy and truth.

    -review of Pompeii by M. Ellis for BoDoï

    (translated by Andrew White)

  4. inu1941-1966:

    Seiichi Hayashi

    http://dismagazine.com/blog/54982/manga-nouvelle-vague-seiichi-hayashis-comics/

  5. franksantoro:

Pompeii - now a major motion picture

    franksantoro:

    Pompeii - now a major motion picture

  6. franksantoro:


Pompeii was reviewed in Le Monde while I was at the Angoulême festival!

====================================

Fires of Love

American Frank Santoro’s Pompeii is disconcerting at first glance in that it falsely appears unfinished; sketched in pencil or drawn in marker, its pages look like drafts of comics. After reading the work, it occurs to you that the author could not have taken a better approach to evoke the evanescence of a world on the brink of annihilation, or how a whimsical romance in 79 A.D., following the sentimental troubles of two Pompeian couples, brutally transforms into pure tragedy with the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. 

-Frederic Potet jan 31 2014 Le Monde

(translation by Andrew White)

    franksantoro:

    Pompeii was reviewed in Le Monde while I was at the Angoulême festival!
    ====================================
    Fires of Love
    American Frank Santoro’s Pompeii is disconcerting at first glance in that it falsely appears unfinished; sketched in pencil or drawn in marker, its pages look like drafts of comics. After reading the work, it occurs to you that the author could not have taken a better approach to evoke the evanescence of a world on the brink of annihilation, or how a whimsical romance in 79 A.D., following the sentimental troubles of two Pompeian couples, brutally transforms into pure tragedy with the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. 
    -Frederic Potet jan 31 2014 Le Monde
    (translation by Andrew White)

  7. Matthew Thurber (INFOMANIACS) →

    fielder:

    "A lot of people are able to use social media more casually than I can and feel less conflicted about it. You go to an art-marketing class, and they tell you that you have to constantly remind people of your existence. Even if you’re not directly telling them to buy your thing, you should be…

  8. jazorspark:

ralph from thurb’s infomaniacs

    jazorspark:

    ralph from thurb’s infomaniacs

  9. Comics for Grownups Episode 29 →

    franksantoro:

    This may be my favorite review of Pompeii - maybe because it is a podcast and I can hear the hosts puzzling it out a bit - really made me feel good. Please check it out!

    comicsforgrownups:

    image

    Comics for Grownups Episode 29 with Joshua Malbin and Alex Rothman is now out on iTunes. Direct RSS link for Android users here.

    In this last episode of 2013 we count down our favorite comics of the year. On a methodological note, we limited ourselves to book-length works that felt…

  10. It’s our friend Matthew Thurber over at The Paris Review, telling ALL. Buy his book, INFOMANIACS, half off for like six more hours, and then available “normal” forever.
anno-ta:

theparisreview:

“The escalation of culture and technology to a certain messianic goal. Is there a point to all this time-wasting activity, or is all this confusion that we feel with technology and all of the metaphysical torture from social media—is it all going to be okay in the future when the singularity happens? We’ll just have evolved?”
An interview with cartoonist Matthew Thurber on his latest graphic novel, Infomaniacs, and the end of the Internet.

Thurber @ The Paris Review.

    It’s our friend Matthew Thurber over at The Paris Review, telling ALL. Buy his book, INFOMANIACS, half off for like six more hours, and then available “normal” forever.

    anno-ta:

    theparisreview:

    “The escalation of culture and technology to a certain messianic goal. Is there a point to all this time-wasting activity, or is all this confusion that we feel with technology and all of the metaphysical torture from social media—is it all going to be okay in the future when the singularity happens? We’ll just have evolved?”

    An interview with cartoonist Matthew Thurber on his latest graphic novel, Infomaniacs, and the end of the Internet.

    Thurber @ The Paris Review.